Cake Donut Mini Muffins Made with Einkorn Flour and Sucanat

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Cake donut mini muffins should come with a warning. They are addicting, and when placed in front of little boys, don’t be surprised if they eat ten each.   I made the donuts healthier with Einkorn flour and sucanat. These are moist, and do taste very similar to a cake donut. The freshly ground nutmeg adds that layer of flavor that draws you into one more bite.

Cake Donut Mini Muffins with Einkorn Flour and Sucanat by Angela Roberts

The recipe was adapted from Renee’s Kitchen Adventures for the Secret Recipe Club. If you’re unfamiliar with the SRC, it’s a club that assigns each of us another blog to choose and make a recipe and keep it a secret until reveal day. It’s a great way to get to know another blogger and take on the challenge of making something new.

Renee stays at home managing her house, her blog and taking care of her three children, after retiring as a hospital  nurse in labor and delivery. Her passion is to create healthy, slimming recipes and often reworks recipes to make them lighter and healthier.

I chose her Cake Donut Mini Muffins   because it looked easy enough to have ready in under 30 minutes and I thought I could take her inspiration and make these a little healthier with Einkorn flour and Sucanat instead of sugar. I did sprinkle regular confectioner’s sugar over them, but very little.

I used Jovial Einkorn flour, and Sucanat. The Einkorn wheat is grown in small batches organically in Italy, and is an ancient wheat in the purest form. I used sucanat because it’s dried cane juice, and does not contain any chemicals that processed white sugar does, while retaining all it’s vitamins and minerals, high in potassium, calcium, vitamin A and magnesium. I used these in exact measurements when adapting the recipe.

The difference between organic Sucanat and white refined sugar, is Sucanat retains it’s nutrient rich molasses substance. Also it does not contain chemicals that take place during the refining process. In addition,  Sucanat has a smaller proportion of sucrose than white sugar and/or high fructose syrup as it is just DRIED sugar cane juice. – See more at: https://www.livinghealthymom.com/sucanat-benefits/#sthash.IU31egWO.dpuf
is Sucanat retains it’s nutrient rich molasses substance. Also it does not contain chemicals that take place during the refining process. In addition,  Sucanat has a smaller proportion of sucrose than white sugar and/or high fructose syrup as it is just DRIED sugar cane juice. – See more at: https://www.livinghealthymom.com/sucanat-benefits/#sthash.IU31egWO.dpuf
is Sucanat retains it’s nutrient rich molasses substance. Also it does not contain chemicals that take place during the refining process. In addition,  Sucanat has a smaller proportion of sucrose than white sugar and/or high fructose syrup as it is just DRIED sugar cane juice. – See more at: https://www.livinghealthymom.com/sucanat-benefits/#sthash.IU31egWO.dpuf

Doughnut Mini Muffins with Einkorn Flour by Angela Roberts

Doughnut Mini Muffins with Einkorn Flour by Angela Roberts

Cake Donut Mini Muffins with Einkorn Flour and Sucanat by Angela Roberts

The only dilemma I had in this recipe was how to spell donut. The original spelling for donut is doughnut, still considered the most correct. However, Dunkin Donuts made donut popular and acceptable. What do you think? Are these cake doughnuts or are these cake donuts?

 

Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

SRC June

Cake Doughnut Mini Muffins using Einkorn flour and sucanat as a sweetener
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time12 mins
Total Time22 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6
Author: Angela Roberts

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cup Einkorn flour or regular all purpose unbleached flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp. nutmeg I might have put a bit more in...I like nutmeg!
  • 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 3/4 cup organic sucanat or regular sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3/4 cups skim milk

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 Degrees
  • Mix all dry ingredients together.
  • Mix oil, sugar, egg and vanilla
  • Add to the dry ingredients, just enough to incorporate.
  • Spray muffin tin with baking spray or oil the tin.
  • Fill each muffin half way.
  • Bake for 10-12 minutes.
  • Makes 24

Please follow me on instagram. If you make this recipe,  please tag me #spinachtiger.

If you love this recipe, please give it five stars. It means a lot. xoxo

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6 Comments

  1. Glad you enjoyed these. Here’s wikipedia’s take on the spelling. “Dough nut”

    The earliest known recorded usage of the term dates to an 1808 short story[9] describing a spread of “fire-cakes and dough-nuts.” Washington Irving’s reference to “doughnuts” in 1809 in his History of New York is more commonly cited as the first written recording of the term. Irving described “balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog’s fat, and called doughnuts, or olykoeks.”[10] These “nuts” of fried dough might now be called doughnut holes. Doughnut is the more traditional spelling, and still dominates outside the US.[11][12] At present, doughnut and the shortened form donut are both pervasive in American English.[13]
    “Donut”

    The first known printed use of donut was in Peck’s Bad Boy and his Pa by George W. Peck, published in 1900, in which a character is quoted as saying, “Pa said he guessed he hadn’t got much appetite, and he would just drink a cup of coffee and eat a donut.”[14] According to John T. Edge (Donuts, an American passion 2006) the alternative spelling “donut” was invented when the New York–based Display Doughnut Machine Corporation abbreviated the word to make it more pronounceable by the foreigners they hoped would buy their automated doughnut making equipment.[15][16] The donut spelling also showed up in a Los Angeles Times article dated August 10, 1929 in which Bailey Millard jokingly complains about the decline of spelling, and that he “can’t swallow the ‘wel-dun donut’ nor the ever so ‘gud bred’.” The interchangeability of the two spellings can be found in a series of “National Donut Week” articles in The New York Times that covered the 1939 World’s Fair. In four articles beginning October 9, two mention the donut spelling. Dunkin’ Donuts, which was so-named in 1950, following its 1948 founding under the name Open Kettle (Quincy, Massachusetts), is the oldest surviving company to use the donut variation; other chains, such as the defunct Mayflower Doughnut Corporation (1931), did not use that spelling.[17] According to the Oxford Dictionary while “doughnut” is used internationally, the spelling “donut” is American.[18] The spelling “donut” remained rare until the 1950s, and has since grown significantly in popularity;[19] this growth in use has possibly been influenced by the spread of Dunkin’ Donuts.[20

  2. i love these little muffins! in my high school french class they were on our approved list for food parties (randomly our teacher would let us plan a food day instead of class- score!). she called them french puffs. so good! i always spell it ‘doughnut’ btw 🙂

  3. These look *wonderful* Angela! They kinda remind me of donu(gh)t holes because of their one-bite size.
    I’m sure you did Renee proud, however you spelled ’em 🙂

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